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Nepal Jungle Safari

The Chitwan National Park (CNP) is a world heritage property, and it also contains a Ramsar Site – Beeshazari Tal in its buffer zone. The CNP has a history of over 3 decades in park management and a rich experience in resolving conflicts between the park and the people. It is a rich natural area in the Terai, the subtropical southern part of Nepal. A total of 68 species of mammals, 544 species of birds, 55 amphibians and reptiles and 126 species of fish have been recorded in the park. The endangered fauna found in the park area. The park is especially renowned for its protection of One Horned Rhinoceros, Royal Bengal Tiger and Gharial Crocodile. Chitwan National Park has long been one the country' treasures of natural wonders. The park is situated in south central Nepal, covering 932 sq. km. in the subtropical lowlands of the inner TERAI. The area comprising the Tikauli forest-from Rapti River to the foothills of the Mahabharat-extending over an area of 175 sq. km. was declared Mrigakunja in 1959. In 1963, the area south of Rapti River was demarcated as a rhinoceros sanctuary. The area was gazette as the country's first National Park in 1973. In 1996, an area of 750 sq. km. surrounding the park was declared a buffer zone which consists of forests and private lands. The park and the local people jointly initiate community development activities and manage natural resources in the buffer zone. The Government has made provision of plowing back 30-50 percent of the park revenue for community development in the buffer zone.

The park consists of a diversity of ecosystems, including the Churia hills, ox-bow lakes and the flood plains of the Rapti, Reu and Narayani rivers. The Churia hills rise slowly towards the east from 150m. to more than 800m. The western portion of the park is comprised of the lower but more rugged “Someshwor hills”. The park shares its western boundary with the “Parsa Wildlife Reserve”. The Chitwan valley consists tropical and subtropical forests. Sal forests cover 70 percent of the park. Sal leaves are used locally for plates in festivals and religious offering. Grassland covers 20% of the park area. There are more that 50 different types of grasses, including the elephant grass (Saccharum spp.), renowned for its immense height. It can grow up to 8meter. The shorter grasses (Imperata spp.) are used for roof thatching, and mats, rope and paper making purpose. The park contains the last Nepalese population (estimated at 400) of the endangered great one-horned Asian rhinoceros which is the second largest concentration of this species to occur after Kaziranga National Park in India. Chitwan is also one of the last strongholds of the Royal Bengal tiger. Other threatened mammals occurring in the park include leopard, wild dog, sloth bear and gaur. Other mammals include sambar, chital, hog deer, barking deer, wild pig, monkeys, otter, porcupine, yellow-throated marten, and civet, fishing cat, jungle cat, jackal, striped hyena and Indian fox. Aquatic species include the gangetic dolphin, the mugger crocodile and the endangered gharial.

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CONTACT INFO

Mystique Nepal Himalayan Trekking and Expedition Pvt. Ltd.
Kathmandu, Nepal

Tel : +977-9849193453
Email : mystiquenepaltreks@yahoo.com

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